Author: Mark Montie

Coronavirus: A Tribute to the Good Guys

Typhoon Data’s primary function is to scrutinize healthcare workers and catch those who are creating problems. But we don’t often have the opportunity to say how grateful we are for the vast majority who are making our lives better. With COVID-19, they’ve taken it to the next level. 

With so many unanswered questions, and with so much speculative and incorrect information that has been propagated, I’d like to give a tribute to some who are doing their best to keep the earth spinning – the medical professionals who are the front line in keeping the rest of us safe. 

This includes the many doctors and nurses who have knowingly put themselves at great risk of contracting the virus themselves, the receptionists who are sometimes expected from a 30-second call to be able to tell you if you have Coronavirus or that everything is going to be okay. Many of us look to our healthcare providers as experts on a novel disease that we’ve gotten so much contradictory information about.

Our national and local leaders have adopted what we once might have considered severe strategies to slow the spread of COVID-19 and prevent the overwhelming our medical system. Overwhelming the system could mean running out of bed space, medicine, and other supplies. But it also means overworking the doctors, nurses, and support staff at these facilities. Long hours and high stress can contribute to being more vulnerable to infection and being less able to fight it off.

Even though we’ve “flattened the curve” significantly, the humans taking care of us have acutely felt the effects of this crisis, perhaps more than anyone. And we’re still in the beginning stages.

We can honor our healthcare workers and at the same time, help the cause by keeping level heads and doing the following:

  • Taking recommended precautions seriously – social distancing, washing hands effectively and often, covering coughs and sneezes, etc.
  • Avoiding the urge to panic and over consume products others need such as face masks, rubber gloves, and yes, toilet paper.
  • Being patient when seeking medical assistance. For example, waiting a little longer for appointments, postponing non-essential check-ups, accepting that you won’t likely be able to get tested for COVID-19.

To all healthcare workers currently running toward this disaster: Thank you for what you do. You are noticed and appreciated. Please take care of yourselves as well.

In addition, I’d like to make honorable mentions of a few other unsung groups of people who are steadying the ship: Store managers who are fighting to keep toilet paper on the shelves. Teachers who are struggling with unfamiliar technology to keep educating our children. Lastly, Typhoon Data’s great employees, who are continuing to get the job done from their homes and doing their part to help medical staffing move forward.

Introducing Dave Rees

Dave Rees

Twenty-five feet off the ground trying to screw in a window frame with freezing, numb fingers, his ladder wedged into position on an icy slope, Dave realized he was more of a people person.

Typhoon Data is firmly rooted in the belief that the people working here are the company. And we’re an interesting group of people. For many, the face and voice of Typhoon Data is Dave Rees. He’s our VP of Business Development and some might say our mascot.

“I like people — not crowds — I like people,” Dave said. “I enjoy connecting, collaborating, working together.”

Truthfully, Dave only worked framing houses to put himself through college. He graduated from Brigham Young University in 1999 expecting to become a counselor. Somehow he found his way into real estate and realized he quite enjoyed the relationships he built through sales and marketing.

Since he came to Typhoon Data, Dave has had many opportunities to make these connections and it’s served everyone involved very well.

“The goal with potential customers is not to sell at all costs, it’s to figure out if we can solve their problems.” Dave said, “If we can, great. If not, we’ll try to send them to someone who can.”

This approach makes for effortless relationships when prospects become customers and good impressions with those who may need our products down the road. Dave is a big believer that you reap what you sow.

Anyone who has been responsible to keep promises made by a salesman, knows how crucial good team communication is.

“Dave is exceptionally good with our clients.” said Erin Kerr, Director of Partner Relations at Typhoon Data. “He sets realistic expectations because he understands our capabilities and he speaks authentically. I think this comes through to clients and helps them feel comfortable.”

Though he isn’t one to seek the spotlight, Dave’s passion for social justice, his innate sense of responsibility, and his strong opinions on just about everything you can think of always seem to put him there. This explains how he reluctantly became the chair of his Republican Caucus precinct. He showed up and he was willing.

Dave is fiscally conservative, but he’s also a fearless advocate for underrepresented people and points of view — people like refugees, whom he supports through an organization called Helping Hands — points of view like his distaste for avocados and public libraries.

Besides his civic engagement, Dave has also involved himself in scouting, church, and is a frequent blood donor. He loves biking, basketball, and what he calls tinkering around his house and garden. Fortunately, most of these activities are great ways to spend time with his wife of 22 years, Lissa, and their six children.

While Dave is a keen people person, that’s not all that’s in it for him at Typhoon Data. He believes in what he sells.

“Our job is to build profits for our partners and the end users of our data, to make them more informed about their employees, and ultimately to raise the quality of healthcare for everyone.”